Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Listening As Meditation - My Without Fail Every Morning Meeting With Mind

Every morning without fail I disconnect from everything - phone, e-mail, even twitter!!! computer, in a word everything - sit for 1/2 hour and consult with the energies in my brainbox, quietly, with an emphasis on listening, and then re-enter what we are pleased to call the world - the strategies accessed during this daily session lead to 'results' that amaze me - it is also a wonderful way to get to know your own mind, its depth levels, its surface sheen, everything in between.

But you have to "go in" with tools.

More anon.

9 comments:

  1. That is a wonderful approach,Wayne. The vedas say that the sandhyas ~ the transition times from night to morning, and morning to evening ~ are indeed ideal times to reconnect with ourselves.

    I look forward to hearing more on your experiences... of your morning meeting with the mind. Do you ever get to a point where all thought ceases, and all you have left is stillness?

    Kumud

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  2. Kumud-
    Yes, that point of stillness comes, and the 'tools' I am taking with me in this daily journey within are the agni mantras of sAmaveda - they have gradually, over the years, become the 'content' of my brainbox, and allow me without thought to explore the mind in its many dimensions - My appetite for this particular approach awakened in the 1960s with what then was being called an 'initiation' into transcendental meditation (later refashioned by Maharishi as 'the science of creative intelligence'). I reasoned that when a mere two syllable mantra came with such power I might as well delve more deeply into the source itself: the Vedas. This became not a matter of scholarship but a matter of simple practice. Like Clint Eastwood, I have WITHOUT FAIL (that is the key) practiced each and every day of my life. The mantras become the content of you brainbox, and, finally, of your mind. All else is the dust of the surface. It is an ever deepening process.
    The cessation of all thought is not an emptiness, but rather a fullness.
    But my next lesson, to be learned through the sterling example of Mr. Eastwood and others, is to be silent about the practice.
    Meanwhile, while I am engaged in the vast task of getting the first 114 mantras of sAmaveda within I am doing a bit of writing about what I am finding.
    I am tweeting you a link to Mr. Eastwood's interview on his practice.
    You are very generous in my direction Kumud, and I want you to know how much I appreciate what you are doing 'for the world' -
    Wayne

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  3. Hi Wayne,
    Daily practice is great. Would like to hear more on how this affects your day to day activities? Do you find that you are able to listen with meditative mind when relating to others?
    Jerry

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  4. Jerry:
    The daily practice permeates each and every thought, activity, and enterprise throughout the day. One's ability to listen to others in a contemplative and receptive fashion is greatly enhanced. The ancient poets of who composed the mantras of the sAmaveda were well aware, beyond the limits of our contemporary psychologists of the dimensions of our mind and the practical application of meditation. Their approach is primal and springs from a pre-conceptual mental and spiritual framework.
    More anon.
    Thank you very much for beginning our communication.
    Wayne

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  5. You're welcome Wayne ... and thanks for inviting the conversation.
    My next question is this; does there come a time when the technique drops away? In practice and/or daily activity?

    Sincerely,
    Jerry

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  6. I listened to a concert by the San Francisco Symphony yesterday on the radio. I loved the concert but found their programming a bit odd...

    Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 4 with Emmanuel Ax
    Webern Symphony
    Beethoven Symphony No. 5

    While the two Beethoven pieces fit nicely together, the Webern piece was more than a bit jarring. It didn't fit with the sound, flow or concept of the other pieces. Because it was on the radio, I didn't have program notes. But, there was a commentator who gave brief notes prior to each piece (during the time MTT was off stage). Nothing he said seem to connect the Webern piece with the Beethoven works other than Webern is from the 2nd Viennese School whereas Beethoven is from the 1st. Tenuous connection at best.

    Anyway... it's been on my mind since the concert yesterday. so, this is my meditation for the morning.

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  7. Chip-
    I guess the reason I think is a great meditation is that I so identify with the mind having such a dilemma - my parallel instance is a program by a pianist who follows the transcendent Schubert Bb Sonata with a group of pieces by Schoenberg - this was to me totally a beyond tenuous connection (they both use all the twelve tones, that's about it) - Thanks for responding. Your response spurs my mind on to another blog post on "program building" - as in "concert program building" -
    Thank you.
    Wayne

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  8. To you who just read this post:
    ..and so it goes...more than two months have passed...I realize it is best that I "leave it at that" for I have said all I require of myself in a few blog posts...but I am always here to engage in conversation by way of responding to your comments..
    Wayne

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  9. La La LOVE this reminder to get quiet... to listen... clear out the clutter and be one with the breath... hear the whispers... ask for guidance... and know in your heart... something wonderful is going to happen today!

    Much love and blessings,

    Ande

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