Saturday, September 4, 2010

How I Became A Musician

When I was born, everyone commented "Oh! Such big ears!" I began to listen. The first sounds I remember were the train whistles and the various chirpings, tweetings, twitterings, cawings, hootings, shriekings, and melodic singings of birds. Sound fascinated me.
When I saw someone winding up the Victrola "talking machine" & placing the needle down on the disc whirling about at 78 revolutions pr. minute I knew that heaven was about to enter the room-through my ears.
Caruso would be singing. It was more lovely and compelling even than the whistling trains and the songs of birds.
Paderewski would be playing Chopin.
I was in love.
I became a musician before I played a note.


14 comments:

  1. Wayne, what a cool story! You have so much more to share, and I'm all ears. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Beautiful post Wayne! Looking forward to more posts!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sounds great Wayne. What type of music do you play then? My fave combination of music & trains is probably Kraftwerk's Trans Europe Express album, something I'll probably cover on my train blog soon enough.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have learned to respond to your kind comments in this fashion after only 4+ months of being on blogger! Now I know, and will be more responsive.
    Thank you!
    Wayne

    ReplyDelete
  5. The first sounds I remember was burbling water in a boat on a river and the chuggle of the motor...

    The next I remember is "Solveig's song"... At a late evening, when I was three of four, my father awakened me to listen "my" song in the radio...

    Being each summer in nature as long as I can remember back in my childhood, I have, of course, heard all the sounds of it at day and night and I learned to love their harmony and beauty very early...

    Both made me a lover of classical music...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you Solveigh - Your memory brought to my memory hearing Solveigh's song aboard a Norwegian merchant vessel at anchor in Rio Harbor -It must be among the most beautiful songs in the world.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I heard my older brother playing the piano when I was very young, so I guess it seemed the obvious thing to do. Knowing your interest in tuning, Wayne, this 100 year old Broadwood upright couldn't be tuned anywhere near 440 - anything more than a minor third below concert and it would have snapped! With the clarinet, my parents took me to a musical evening at a friends house when I was about 9 or 10. I heard someone play the clarinet and told my parents that I wanted to learn how to play it myself. Fortunately they supported me in that!
    They had to get a more up to date and tunable piano so I could be accompanied!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Henry:
    Thanks for sharing this story, especially this: ' I heard someone play the clarinet and told my parents that I wanted to learn how to play it myself. Fortunately they supported me in that!
    They had to get a more up to date and tunable piano so I could be accompanied!'
    That is a beautiful tribute to your parents' dedication to your musical development.
    Wayne

    ReplyDelete
  9. I was born with a song in my heart. I couldn't speak until I was 2. After that point, I couldn't stop talking or singing.

    My grandfathers were both musical, one a bluegrass musician with a house full of instruments and the other a dabbler on blues guitar. From a young age, I was exposed to all sorts of music from gospel to bluegrass to country to pop to classical to ambience/new age.

    My brother was in the band. I grew up knowing I would be in the band as well, and I knew I would be a flute player. I continued and the epiphany that I am a musician has led me down a path of self-discovery and exploration. It has kept my creative self alive and well.

    ReplyDelete
  10. How I became a musician,slowly. Years of singing and playing anything and everything and realising that making music is the the only thing that makes sense of life. It moves and restores like nothing else.
    40 years later ,I am still that child singing away with a heart fit to burst

    ReplyDelete
  11. Sensible Flutist -
    I love the way you express 'the epiphany that I am a musician' and then lead that into the open road of a life of creativity...
    Thanks for the story.
    Wayne

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anon:
    Thank you for bringing your story to our story room here. Love the observation Music 'moves and restores like nothing else.'
    Thank you.
    Wayne

    ReplyDelete
  13. Music was always on at the house - not typically classical, but still good stuff. My parents and brother were always introducing me to new things, and I was always singing. When we'd visit grandma, I'd play things by ear on her piano. Eventually she gave her piano to my parents. I started taking lessons, and started writing little things on piano and guitar. I didn't think I'd take composition seriously until I got to college - and I haven't taken it for granted since!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Michael-
    Thank you for sharing your story with us. You are a very fortunate musician to have been blessed as a child with such parents and a brother-(and a grandma with a piano!-)
    Wayne

    ReplyDelete